David Peat Retrospective

Last week I visited the Trongate 103 Gallery in Glasgow, which houses Street Level Photoworks. There, I saw a retrospective exhibition of the work of the late David Peat. Shot in monochrome, the images formed two selections; the first, Glasgow depicted in 1968, and focussing on the Gorbals, Maryhill and Tradeston; the second, a body of work captured in different places around the world.

This afternoon, there was a talk by Ray McKenzie, which looked at Peat’s work and offered a commentary on some of the images from the collection.

At the end of the talk, I had the opportunity to meet and talk with David Bruce, former director of the Edinburgh International Film Festival – and the man responsible for bringing Peat’s photography out into the open. David Peat was primarily a film-maker, but one who enjoyed photography and who – to begin with – observed the street urchins and the crumbling decay of Glasgow in the Sixties, creating a body of work comparable to that of Oscar Marzaroli. And that body of work is perhaps more powerful now than it was then, offering social commentary, wry humour, and that ‘decisive moment’ captured in an age past.

David Bruce very kindly agreed to allow me to make this portrait of him, standing beside David Peat’s image entitled ‘Mask, Barcelona’. My thanks to Mr Bruce – both for his kindness today, and for his endeavours regarding the work of David Peat.

You can read more about the exhibition in this article in The Scotsman.

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