long exposure

Chatelherault

Chatelherault - © willomailley.com

Chatelherault - © willomailley.com

The classic view of Chatelherault is from the front of the building. However, I liked this view of the Duke’s hunting lodge, taken from the side and up on the small hill. This view gave a nice perspective of the place, as well as making the most of the leading lines around the grounds. The four minute exposure made the most of the wonderful sky yesterday, giving it some nice movement.

 

Armadillo

Armadillo - © willomailley.com

Armadillo - © willomailley.com

This is another image that I’ve processed in several different ways; on this occasion, I wanted something verging toward hi-key, to try to bring out the strong shapes and tones contained within the image. It meant losing a lot of the detail that was already present in the sky, but I think the result was worth it.

 

Sea Groyne

Sea Groyne - © willomailley.com

Sea Groyne - © willomailley.com

A file from my archives, this was an exposure made over three minutes. The hardest part was getting enough time alone with the groyne as there were constantly people walking along the beach and a large dog was intent on getting into the shot. Originally a colour image, I felt it also worked well in monochrome.

 

Dunmore House

The ruins of Dunmore House, Airth, ancestral seat of the Earl of Dunmore. Despite the state of the building now, it is clear that this was once a magnificent house. It is sad that in the present day, it is nothing more than an empty shell.

The building was perfect for some monochrome, long exposure and HDR work and these images are the results of my visit to the house.

In 1820-22 the 5th Earl of Dunmore commissioned the architect William Wilkins to build Dunmore Park, a magnificent mansion very similar to Dalmeny House completed a few years previously.  It was occupied by the family until their departure in 1911 and remained as a private home until 1961. After a short spell as a girls school from then until 1964 it was abandoned. Although substantial parts of the building were demolished much remains to remind us of its grandeur and of our criminal neglect of our heritage.

The Pineapple

The Pineapple - © willomailley.com

The Pineapple - © willomailley.com

Described as “the oddest building in Scotland’, the ‘Pineapple’ in Airth certainly looks quite bizarre – although also very intriguing.

Built in 1761, it was a prime example of a folly and intended as a summerhouse, sitting within 16 acres of beautiful countryside. The building was heated by a furnace circulating warm air and so sitting alongside the Pineapple are four chimneys craftily disguised as vases.

Commissioned by John Murray, the fourth Earl of Dunmore, he had the idea to make the building in the shape of a pineapple – which, at that time, had only been in Scotland for around thirty years; they were seen as a symbol of power, prestige and (apparently) hospitality.

An oak tree was planted close to the Pineapple in 1998 and this notes the intention of Malcom, the present Earl of Dunmore, to re-establish his family links with the Pineapple.